Category Archives: green energy

From waste to wealth: transforming greenhouse waste into energy

Animesh Dutta

By Jane Robinson

Guelph – When Animesh Dutta ponders the problems of the world, he lands on energy security, food security and climate change. The University of Guelph researcher’s latest project holds promise for addressing all three.

As professor and director of the Bio-Renewable Innovation Lab in the School of Engineering, Dutta focuses on taking waste from farms or food processors and finding the best solution to convert it into renewable energy that will maximize the economics.

When he started working on bioenergy, Dutta saw the benefits of creating a renewable source of energy that didn’t interfere with food production.

“The economics don’t seem to be there for using feedstock for bioenergy,” he says. “You have to purchase the raw product and farmers want a price for their biomass crop that is higher than the value of the bioenergy it makes.” Continue reading

London company derives green energy and fertilizer from food waste

By Matt McIntosh

London ON – Food waste is a big issue, but StormFisher Environmental, a London-area green energy company, is turning part of the problem into an environmental positive.

Using once-edible food from Ontario processors, grocery stores, and restaurants, the company produces organic-based fertilizer that can be used by landscapers to beautify lawns, and farmers to grow crops. Generating electricity from biogas – a key byproduct of producing the fertilizer – is also a key part of the business.

“Generating biogas and turning it into a renewable fuel is well-known technology, and there’s a real need here for the sustainable disposal of organic waste […] our design fits well” says Chris Guillon, vice-president of StormFisher Environmental.

Each year, the company converts about 80,000 tonnes of food waste into enough energy to power about 3,000 homes, and make 2,000 tonnes of organic-based fertilizer. Electricity is fed back into the provincial grid, while the fertilizer is all locally sold. Continue reading

Northern communities to benefit from local-made fuel initiative

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Prof. Lew Christopher

By Lisa McLean for AgInnovation Ontario

Thunder Bay – For remote Northern Ontario communities, getting fuel isn’t easy. Large quantities of petrodiesel are routinely flown long distances, at significant financial and environmental expense.

Now, a new partnership between researchers and community representatives offers a unique solution: make energy-efficient biodiesel in the community where it will be used.

The project is called the Sustainable Energy Community Initiative for Northern Ontario (SECINO) and is being led by Dr. Lew Christopher, who heads up the Biorefining Research Institute (BRI) at Thunder Bay’s Lakehead University. Continue reading

Start your engines: The 200,000-acre promise

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This article is from Soy 20/20, one of the AgInnovation Ontario partner organizations.

By Lisa McLean for Soy 20/20

A California tech company is driving towards a piece of the lucrative motor oil market with a clean-running product that outperforms its premium synthetic petroleum counterparts.

The motor oil – which utilizes oil from high oleic soybeans, a crop rich in Omega 9 fatty acids – offers promise to Canadian soybean farmers interested in growing premium beans.

Greg Blake, Senior Vice President of Biosynthetic Technologies, discussed his company’s product at the 25th Canadian Conference on Fats and Oilseeds held in Quebec City October 5-6.

Blake says his company has studied non-food oil products for many years, and its researchers have successfully managed to overcome the challenges associated with using vegetable oil in motor oil and other demanding lubricant applications. Continue reading

Building the bioeconomy in Ontario’s North

WoodPellets

By Lilian Schaer for AgInnovation Ontario

North Bay – A new centre is driving development of the bioeconomy in northern Ontario. The Biomass North Development Centre – Biomass North for short – was formed this past summer after Nipissing University withdrew its support from the Biomass Innovation Centre it had established in 2009.

The focus of the new not-for-profit is research, innovation, and growth in clean technology and the bioeconomy, mostly centred around forestry, as a way to stimulate economic development and job creation in Ontario’s North.

“We have a robust bioeconomy emerging in northern Ontario that needs the type of support that Biomass North can provide,” explains Project Director Francis Gallo. “That includes providing news and information to our members, marketing and technical support, as well as opportunities for business and development.” Continue reading